Expert claims the US can stop the spread of coronavirus by JUNE


Dr Paul Offit (pictured) says he believes the U.S. can get the coronavirus pandemic under control by June

A public health expert claims the U.S. may be able to control the spread of the novel coronavirus by this summer.

Despite America recording its highest single-day death toll with more than 4,300 fatalities, Dr Paul Offit told CNN’s New Day he is optimistic for several reasons.

Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center and a physician in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, says two new vaccines are soon expected to be approved, which will speed up the national rollout.

He adds that with warmer weather and the incoming Biden administration, the U.S. may be able to stop the transmission of COVID-19 by June. 

Currently, there are only two vaccines approved for emergency use authorization in the U.S.: one by Pfizer and the other by Moderna.

Both require two doses and are administered between three and four weeks apart.

However, Offit says two ‘remarkably effective’ vaccines are ‘right around the corner’ from Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca/University of Oxford.

Early results show that a single dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine induced an antibody response in 97 percent of participants while the AstraZeneca jab was shown to be 70.4 percent effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19. 

He says mass vaccination sites will help speed up the rollout as will the Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca vaccines, which don't need to be stored in freezers. Pictured: A dose of the AstraXeneca-0xford Covid-19 vaccine in Newcastle, England, January 13

He says mass vaccination sites will help speed up the rollout as will the Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca vaccines, which don’t need to be stored in freezers. Pictured: A dose of the AstraXeneca-0xford Covid-19 vaccine in Newcastle, England, January 13

Mass vaccinations combined with the number of people who already have been infected will also help bring the U.S. closer to herd immunity. Pictured: People wait in cars for a vaccination against the coronavirus at a new 'vaccination superstation' in San Diego, January 11

Mass vaccinations combined with the number of people who already have been infected will also help bring the U.S. closer to herd immunity. Pictured: People wait in cars for a vaccination against the coronavirus at a new ‘vaccination superstation’ in San Diego, January 11

J&J’s vaccine is a one-shot jab and both companies have made shots that can be stored in the refrigerator.

This means they will be easier for pharmacies and other medical centers to store because they do not require the ultra-cold temperatures of the other two vaccines.

What’s more, having such an easy vaccine to distribute as mass vaccination sites are set up across the country.

Such locations in Citi Field, home of the New York Mets; Gillette Stadium, home of the New England Patriots; the Pennsylvania Convention Center and even Disneyland.

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